The Origin of Jesus’ Body

Question #6 – How Did Jesus Lack Qualities for Which God is Known?

The One true God manifests qualities common only to Him. These include Him filling all time and space (omnipresent), Him having all power (omnipotent), and Him knowing all things (omniscient). The Flesh of God theology believes Jesus’ flesh is synonymous with God’s flesh. With that in mind ask yourself, can a supernatural God that is wrapped in supernatural flesh lack qualities for which God is known? The obvious answer is, no He can’t…yet the Bible indicates that Jesus did.

Before diving further into question #6, let me set the record straight: I believe in only One God. Because I wanted that truth to be the first thing taught to them, seconds after each of my children were born, I quoted to them the Shema in Deuteronomy 6:4. God and God alone is mankind’s Creator and Savior. Nowhere do I find the Bible speaking of any other. So, this study does not teach there is a Twinity consisting of a Senior God and a Junior God. Instead, it’s purpose is to reveal that the flesh in which the One Almighty God was robed was human rather than Divine. Unlike the other questions in this series, Question #6 will not focus on what Jesus did or is, but will instead look at what He didn’t do or isn’t. Hopefully what I mean by this will soon become clear.

The Perfect Imperfect Man

Nowhere does the Bible say that Jesus had a sick day, but it does speak of the resurrected Jesus having open wounds, not scars, and a face so disfigured from the beating He received that He was unrecognizable (John 20:27; ). Also, since God is eternal having no beginning or end, how was Jesus the virgin-born begotten son of God who later died on a cross and was buried for three days? Because an eternal God is not affected by fleshly needs, God never sleeps or needs sustenance, so why did Jesus sleep during a storm at sea, hunger after a 40-day fast, and claim thirst on the cross? These are needs common to human flesh, so if Jesus’ flesh was divine, why did He need such things? However, if Jesus was God in a human body, then the God inside would be perfect while the flesh in which God resides would be, like all men, affected by pain, injuries, hunger, thirst, exhaustion, immortality, and even spiritual longing.

Hebrews 5:5-10 So also Christ glorified not himself to be made a high priest; but he that said unto him, Thou art my Son, today have I begotten thee. (6) As he saith also in another place, Thou art a priest forever after the order of Melchizedek. (7) Who IN THE DAYS OF HIS FLESH, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared; (8) THOUGH HE WERE A SON, yet LEARNED HE OBEDIENCE by the things which he suffered; (9) And BEING MADE PERFECT, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him; (10) Called of God a high priest after the order of Melchizedek.

How does an omniscient God learn? How was He imperfect? We will use scriptural descriptions of Jesus (God made flesh) to answer these questions—and some others. We will begin by asking, how did God “learn.”

Learned He Obedience

The Bible says Jesus “learned obedience.” If He was the all-knowing God, wouldn’t this degree of ignorance make God imperfect? To help answer this, we should determine the meaning of the Greek word translated here as “learned.” Strong’s defines this as:

Manthano (G3129): Prolonged from a primary verb, another form of which, matheo, is used as an alternate in certain tenses; to learn (in any way): – learn, understand.

Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries

So, “learned” (manthano) is the action of receiving knowledge that was before unknown. This learning is like a teacher educating a child about ABC’s. No child is born with the knowledge of the alphabet, so for them to properly communicate in their language, they must be taught the sounds, forms, and usage of the alphabet’s letters. In the same vein, Noah Webster purposed his 1828 Dictionary of American English to be a resource for Bible study. He understood that a person needed to learn the meaning of English words to properly learn what is written in an English Bible. This is how Noah Webster defined what it is to “learn”:

LEARN: (1) To gain knowledge of; to acquire knowledge or ideas of something before unknown. We learn the use of letters, the meaning of words and the principles of science. We learn things by instruction, by study, and by experience and observation. It is much easier to learn what is right, than to unlearn what is wrong.

Webster’s Dictionary of American English 1828

If Jesus was the omniscient God without any humanity, how did He learn anything? This question cannot be answered by Flesh of God advocates without them undermining their position.

Being Made Perfect

Not only did Jesus “learn,” Hebrews 5:9 also states that He was “made perfect.” Thus, Jesus must have started imperfect for this perfection to be reached. Strong’s defines this “perfect” as:

Teleioo (G5048): From G5046; TO COMPLETE, that is, (literally) accomplish, or (figuratively) consummate (in character): – consecrate, finish, fulfil, (MAKE) PERFECT.”

Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries

This is not the same “perfect” as found in the following command:

Matthew 5:48 Be ye therefore PERFECT, even as your Father which is in heaven is PERFECT.” This “perfect” is the Greek word “telos.” Strong’s defines this as follows:

Telos” (G5056): From a primary word tello (to set out for a definite point or goal); properly the point aimed at as a limit, that is, (by implication) THE CONCLUSION OF AN ACT OR STATE (termination [literally, figuratively or indefinitely], result [immediate, ultimate or prophetic], purpose); specifically an impost or levy (as paid): – + continual, custom, end (-ing), finally, uttermost. Compare G5411.”

Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries

From these definitions we see that “teleioo” speaks of one working to perfection, while “telos” speaks of one who is perfection. If Jesus had perfect “God-flesh,” as Flesh of God advocates contend, what imperfection did He possess that still needed teleioo (working to) perfecting? The Bible says Jesus’ life was made completed or fulfilled (teleioo/perfect) only after He learned a lesson of obedience. How can a perfect (telos) God need to be “made perfect” (teleioo)? The situation found in Hebrews 5:5-10 would make no sense if it were not for the issue that Jesus’ humanity needed to be perfected before He could perfectly fulfill all required of Him.

This next passage indicates Jesus grew in other areas as well:

Luke 2:52 And JESUS INCREASED IN WISDOM AND STATURE, and IN FAVOR with God and man.

You have to lack something before you can gain an increase. Strong’s comes to this same conclusion when it defines “increase” as follows:

Prokopto (G4298): From G4253 and G2875; to drive forward (as if by beating), that is, (figuratively and intransitively) to advance (in amount, to grow; in time, to be well along): – increase, proceed, profit, be far spent, wax.

Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries

So, the Bible says that in time, Jesus grew in “wisdom and stature, and in favor with God.” Please, remember, I strongly believe there is one true God and that Jesus was that God manifested in the flesh. So, the question at hand is NOT IF JESUS WAS GOD IN THE FLESH, but IF THE FLESH GOD WAS IN WAS HUMAN OR DIVINE. This takes us to the next part of this study.

In The Days Of His Flesh

Hebrews 5:7 talks of a space of time when Jesus was in flesh. Other Bible translations have this speaking of the years during which Jesus was on earth. Since we know Jesus was God manifested in Flesh, these are synonymous, at least they are if you believe His flesh served a limited purpose. What I mean by “limited” is found in verse such as this:

John 1:14  And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and WE BEHELD HIS GLORY, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.

Jesus’ flesh allowed the Almighty God to share Himself with His creation. As a Spirit, God did not need flesh. He also would not need flesh after His work on earth was finished. God only needed human flesh to fulfill His redemptive work through Jesus Christ. Thus, the writer of Hebrews speaks of a time period when God had flesh, and this flesh is how men and women were able to behold His glory.

So, does the Bible say that the omniscient, omnipresent, omnipotent, eternal God was born a man? The apostle John answered this question for us. In the opening verses of his gospel, John writes that the “word” was “manifested in flesh” (see John 1:1, John 1:14).

John 1:1-2 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. (2) The same was in the beginning with God.

John 1:14 And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.

The “word” spoken of in these passages is “logos” (Strong’s G3056). Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible defines logos as follows:

LOGOS.—In classical Greek logos signifies both ‘word’ and ‘reason,’ but in the LXX and the NT it is used, with few exceptions, in the former sense only. When it is God’s word that is spoken of, it denotes the DECLARATION OR REVELATION OF THE DIVINE WILL, and specifically the Christian gospel as the UTTERANCE OF THE DIVINE PLAN OF SALVATION (e.g. Mat 13:19-23 ||, Php 1:14). But in the Prologue to the Fourth Gospel (Joh 1:1 [3 times] 14, with which cf. 1Jn 1:1 [1Jn 5:7 of AV is spurious; see RV] and Rev 19:13) ‘Logos’ (EV Word) is APPLIED TO JESUS CHRIST, and is used to set forth His peculiar glory as the only-begotten Son of God, who is also the Life and Light of men. It is with this Johannine Logos that we have now to deal, and in doing so it seems necessary to consider (1) the content of John’s Logos doctrine; (2) its sources; (3) its place in the Fourth Gospel; (4) its theological significance.

Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible

Therefore, we can see that John’s uses logos to speak of God’s perfect plan, which resulted in it being “made flesh” (more on this later). The apostle Paul echoed John when he wrote that “God” was “manifested in the flesh” (1 Timothy 3:16). The Bible makes clear that this perfect plan and its “manifestation” “in flesh” merged together in the prophesied Savior, Jesus Christ (see Matthew 1:20-23; Hebrews 1:1-2, Hebrews 2:14-17, Hebrews 10:5; 2 John 1:7).

Before interpreting what is said in John 1, we should establish what is meant by “in the beginning.” It is abundantly clear that the New Covenant was already in God’s mind before beginning His creative work in Genesis (see 1 Peter 1:19-20; Titus 1:2; Ephesians 1:4; Revelation 13:8). Therefore, Jesus was in God’s mind before the “beginning,” which included all that He fulfilled (see Genesis 1:27; Proverbs 8:22-31; John 1:3; 1 Corinthians 8:6Ephesians 3:9; Colossians 1:14-17). In other words, God’s perfect plan was in God’s mind before He created anything on earth or in Heaven. God being the omniscient author and the omnipotent influencer of this perfect plan is the explanation for its many fulfilled prophecies. So, the understanding that Jesus was God’s perfect plan before time began explains John’s purpose for his usage of, “in the beginning.”

Like, “in the beginning,” the phrase, “the first,” also speaks of an eternal state of existence before time. Similarly, the expression, “the last,” also speaks of eternity except it speaks of an eternal existence stretching beyond what man understands as “time.” Isaiah uses “the first” and “the last” to express the Lord’s interactions before the time of man’s creation as well as what remains after a man’s lifetime.

Isaiah 41:4 Who hath wrought and done it, calling the generations from the beginning? I the LORD, the first, and with the last; I am he.

Isaiah’s usage of “the first” corresponds with the previous explanation for “in the beginning” (John 1:1). However, his addition of the term, “the last,” adds a declaration of God’s eternal timeless. The Amplified Bible’s translation of this verse brings this meaning out very clearly.

Isaiah 41:4 Amp Who has prepared and done this, calling forth and guiding the destinies of the generations [of the nations] from the beginning? I, the Lord—the first [existing before history began] and with the last [an ever-present, unchanging God]—I am He.

Isaiah mentions God being before and after time in the following verse:

Isaiah 44:6 Thus saith the LORD the King of Israel, and his redeemer the LORD of hosts; I AM THE FIRST, AND I AM THE LAST; and beside me there is no God.

Here, Isaiah links “the King of Israel” and the “redeemer” with being “the first” and “the last.” Since the Bible identifies Jesus as being both the “King of kings” and the prophesied “redeemer,” He would thus be the one who is “the first” and “the last.” As mentioned before, the Bible continually confirms that Jesus was God’s perfect plan since before creation. It also says that Jesus is alive forevermore (Revelation 1:17-18; Romans 6:9). From these truths, we can identify Jesus as being both “the first” and “the last.”

The Apostles undeniably describe Jesus surpassing time and Old Testament Law by being the perfect plan through which God manifests His will to mankind. Jesus does not deny this, and in this next verse, He admits to being the main focus of this in the Bible:

John 5:39 Search THE SCRIPTURES; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and THEY ARE THEY WHICH TESTIFY OF ME.

Jesus made Himself the subject of all that’s written in the Old Testament books of the Law, Psalms, and Prophets. Such an idea does not mean that every person in the Bible was Jesus, or that they were a type of Jesus, but rather that the Bible’s overall message is Jesus Christ and the perfect plan He was to fulfill, which originated before time. Woven throughout the Old Testament are many examples of Jesus being God’s perfect plan for mankind. A few examples of this includes: the prophecy about a coming redeemer made in the Garden of Eden; the ark that saved Noah and his family; the sacrifice promised to Abraham as a substitute for Isaac; the angel that wrestled and transformed Jacob; the rock in the wilderness from which water flowed to the thirsty Children of Israel; the innocent lamb sacrificed for Passover; the High Priest ministering for the sins of God’s people; the scapegoat led into the wilderness for man’s sins. These are just a few of the Old Testament types and shadows that speak of Jesus being God’s perfect plan.

John agrees that Jesus is the perfect plan God made before all creation when uses the Greek word “logos” in the opening statements of his gospel. To help see this, first read these verses with the terms Word, He, His, Him, light, and Jesus Christ in UPPERCASE letters.

John 1:1-18 In the beginning was the WORD, and the WORD was with God, and the WORD was God. (2) The same was in the beginning with God. (3) All things were made by HIM; and without HIM was not any thing made that was made. (4) In HIM was life; and the life was the LIGHT of men. (5) And the LIGHT shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. (6) There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. (7) The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the LIGHT, that all men through him might believe. (8) He was not that LIGHT, but was sent to bear witness of that LIGHT. (9) That was the true LIGHT, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. (10) He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not. (11) HE came unto his own, and HIS own received HIM not. (12) But as many as received HIM, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on HIS name: (13) Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. (14) And the WORD was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld HIS glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. (15) John bare witness of HIM, and cried, saying, This was HE of whom I spake, HE that cometh after me is preferred before me: for HE was before me. (16) And of HIS fulness have all we received, and grace for grace. (17) For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by JESUS CHRIST. (18) No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, HE hath declared him.

Now read these verses again with the phrase “perfect plan” substituted for Word, He, His, Him, light, and Jesus Christ. I used UPPERCASE lettering to highlight this change.

John 1:1-18 In the beginning was THE PERFECT PLAN, and the PERFECT PLAN was with God, and THE PERFECT PLAN was God. (2) The same was in the beginning with God. (3) All things were made by THE PERFECT PLAN; and without THE PERFECT PLAN was not any thing made that was made. (4) In THE PERFECT PLAN was life; and the life was the THE PERFECT PLAN of men. (5) And THE PERFECT PLAN shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. (6) There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. (7) The same came for a witness, to bear witness of THE PERFECT PLAN, that all men through him might believe. (8) He was not that PERFECT PLAN, but was sent to bear witness of that PERFECT PLAN. (9) That was the true PERFECT PLAN, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. (10) THE PERFECT PLAN was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not. (11) THE PERFECT PLAN came unto his own, and HIS own received THE PERFECT PLAN not. (12) But as many as received THE PERFECT PLAN, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on THE PERFECT PLAN’s name: (13) Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. (14) And the THE PERFECT PLAN was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld HIS glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth. (15) John bare witness of THE PERFECT PLAN, and cried, saying, This was THE PERFECT PLAN of whom I spake, HE that cometh after me is preferred before me: for THE PERFECT PLAN was before me. (16) And of HIS fulness have all we received, and grace for grace. (17) For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by THE PERFECT PLAN. (18) No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, THE PERFECT PLAN hath declared him.

John the Baptist’s purpose was to preach the message of Jesus Christ being God’s perfect plan to mankind (see John 1:6-8). John was representative of the Old Covenant (Matthew 11:13-14). The Old Covenant was the ‘older plan’ that was the servant that led students to the great teacher—Jesus Christ (see Galatians 3:24-26). This is akin to Moses (the Old Covenant/the older plan/John the Baptist) leading the children of Israel to the edge of the Promise Land, and Joshua (the New Covenant/ the permanent perfect plan /Jesus Christ) taking over and leading the faithful believers through the Jordan and into the promise. Moses and Joshua were types and shadows of what was to come. Moses foretold what this plan “to come” would be:

Deuteronomy 18:15-19 The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, LIKE UNTO ME; UNTO HIM YE SHALL HEARKEN; (16) According to all that thou desiredst of the LORD thy God in Horeb in the day of the assembly, saying, Let me not hear again the voice of the LORD my God, neither let me see this great fire any more, that I die not. (17) And the LORD said unto me, They have well spoken that which they have spoken. (18) I will RAISE THEM UP A PROPHET FROM AMONG THEIR BRETHREN, LIKE UNTO THEE, and will put MY WORDS IN HIS MOUTH; and he shall speak unto them all that I shall command him. (19) And it shall come to pass, that whosoever will not hearken unto MY WORDS WHICH HE SHALL SPEAK IN MY NAME, I will require it of him.

Moses prophesied that a man, like himself, would come. That when that man did come, He would become the perfect one to whom everyone should listen and obey. These words of Moses are quoted in the New Testament (see Matthew 17:5; Mark 9:7; Luke 9:35; John 10:20; Acts 3:22). When comparing the context of these accounts with that in Deuteronomy 18, we see that Moses was prophesying about Jesus and how His coming would usher in God’s perfect plan to mankind. This promise has already come to pass in Jesus’ New Covenant gospel. Through its message, the obedient receive salvation and the disobedient receive judgment. As such, this New Covenant perfect plan speaks of both God’s glorious salvation and His terrible judgment. This is the message the Apostle John was conveying in these verses:

John 3:16-18 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. (17) For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but THAT THE WORLD THROUGH HIM MIGHT BE SAVED. (18) HE THAT BELIEVETH ON HIM IS NOT CONDEMNED: but HE THAT BELIEVETH NOT IS CONDEMNED ALREADY, because HE HATH NOT BELIEVED IN THE NAME OF THE ONLY BEGOTTEN SON OF GOD.

The writer of the Book of Hebrews also states that Jesus is God’s perfect plan.

Hebrews 1:1-4 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers BY THE PROPHETS, (2) Hath in these last days SPOKEN UNTO US BY HIS SON, whom he hath appointed HEIR OF ALL THINGS, BY WHOM ALSO HE MADE THE WORLDS; (3) Who BEING THE BRIGHTNESS OF HIS GLORY, AND THE EXPRESS IMAGE OF HIS PERSON, and UPHOLDING ALL THINGS BY THE WORD OF HIS POWER, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; (4) Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance OBTAINED A MORE EXCELLENT NAME than they.

Biblical examples like these demonstrate the work Jesus did was foreseen “in the beginning” before anything was created. But in the phrase, “in the days of His flesh,” we see that the flesh used to fulfill this perfect plan had a beginning and an ending. It began as a “begotten” son. This is found in verses such as Luke 7:12, Luke 8:42, Luke 9:38; John 1:14, John 1:18, John 3:16, John 3:18; Hebrews 11:17; 1 John 4:9. The word “begotten” is also used in what is probably the most quoted scripture in the Bible, John 3:16.

John 3:16  For God so loved the world, that he gave his only BEGOTTEN Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

This “begotten” is from the Greek word monogenēs, which means the following:

monogenēs (G3439)
1) single of its kind, only
1a) used of only sons or daughters (viewed in relation to their parents)
1b) used of Christ, denotes the only begotten son of God

Thayer’s Greek Definitions

Webster’s defines “begotten” as:

get. Procreated; generate

Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828)

So, “begotten” speaks of the natural birth of a son or a daughter, thus, in the case of Jesus, it speaks of His birth from His virgin mother, Mary. If Jesus’ flesh was from Heaven and had always existed, how would there be a time of beginning? However, if God’s perfect plan was birthed in human flesh, such an origin would correspond with the way in which all sons are born. This source of Jesus’ origin agrees with the prophecies like found in Deuteronomy 18:15, Isaiah 9:6-7, and Hebrews 1:2. These prophecies were fulfilled in detail. Such fulfillment both proves that the Bible is Divinely inspired and they help confirm that Jesus is the true Savior of mankind. They also show that “the word” refers to Jesus Christ and His New Covenant, which, since first instituted, has been the perfect—and only—plan that can reconcile men and women to God.

A Final Word

Jesus could not increase unless He had room for expansion and growth. Though Luke 2:52 is dealing with a young Jesus, his statement is not about the child Jesus growing in physical stature. Instead, Luke is saying that Jesus had room to grow in the areas of wisdom and favor with God. The apostle Peter wrote that this is the same type of spiritual growth that all men and women should experience.

2 Peter 3:18 But grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and for ever. Amen.

How can an omniscient God that knows all things lack perfect wisdom in anything? How can God grow to be more favorable with God? “Favor” is the word “charis” or “grace.” In describing this growth, Albert Barnes said the following:

“This does not imply that he ever lacked the favor of God, but that God regarded him with favor in proportion as he showed an understanding and spirit like his own.”

Albert Barnes’ Notes on the Bible

This “proportion” agrees exactly with the biblical term “grace” as seen here:

charis (G5485) From G5463graciousness (as gratifying), of manner or act (abstract or concrete; literal, figurative or spiritual; especially the divine influence upon the heart, and its reflection in the life; including gratitude): – acceptable, benefit, favour, gift, grace (-ious), joy liberality, pleasure, thank (-s, -worthy).

Strong’s Hebrew and Greek Dictionaries

Notice that this grace is “especially” seen in “the divine influence upon the heart, and its reflection in the life.” Thus, God’s grace is received when the person receiving that grace reflects it back to God in an action that indicates God’s influence on their life. Thus, the one receiving this grace must first have lacked that grace. Such growth would be impossible if Jesus was God in God flesh. However, it would be possible if Jesus’ flesh was human.

The day that Adam and Eve sinned by eating the fruit, they lost their spiritual connection to God. This detachment is the same for any sinner from that time until today. To help men and women regain this attachment, in the Old Covenant, God had Moses build a Tabernacle from a Heavenly pattern he was shown (see Exodus 25:9; Hebrews 8:5). It was a dwelling for God’s presence that was covered by animal skins (see Exodus 26:14; Ezekiel 16:10). Inside this Tabernacle was a room called “The Most Holy Place.” It acted as the place where God was most found. This same room housed the Ark of the Covenant and the Mercy seat (see Exodus 25:16-17). This furniture served as God’s Throne since it was the place where God communicated to His people through their High Priest (see Exodus 25:22). God commanded a veil be made to separate this Most Holy Place from all other places (see Exodus 26:31-34). Such separation is synonymous with the meaning of holiness, hence, the reason for this room being called the “Holy of Holies.” The New Testament says this veil was a type and shadow of the flesh that God used to robe Himself (see Hebrews 10:19-20). Anywhere Jesus was found was the place where God was most found, therefore, Jesus was the living Most Holy Place (see Matthew 1:23; ). Similar to the Tabernacle, Jesus became the dwelling place for God’s presence, only His covering was human skin instead of an animal’s (see Colossians 2:9). Under God’s direction, the Tabernacle’s Veil was made by man. Similarly, God used a woman (womb-man) to produce a body to veil God’s presence. Moses’ Veil covered the Ark of the Covenant whenever the priests moved the Tabernacle (see Numbers 4:5). Jesus’ flesh served a similar purpose for it covered the glory of God while allowing that glorious presence to move among His people (see John 1:14; 1 Timothy 3:16).

There were occasions in the Old Testament where God manifested Himself to man. Some of these include appearing to Adam in the Garden, Abraham at Moreh in Shechem, Jacob at Peniel, and Moses on Mount Sinai (see Genesis 3:8, Genesis 12:7, Genesis 32:24-30, Exodus 34:5-28). Such appearances are known as theophanies. But the appearance of Jesus is different; His was not a spiritual appearance but was instead a flesh and bone human body that contained “the fullness of the Godhead” (see Colossians 1:19, 2:9; John 14:9-10; 1 Timothy 3:16; Titus 2:13). This same flesh and bone human body arose from the grave, as witnessed in this verse:

John 20:27  Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.

“Here, Thomas, touch the flesh and bones of my hands and my side…” Thomas responded to this by proclaiming:

John 20:28  And Thomas answered and said unto him, MY LORD and MY GOD.

Like the other disciples, Thomas had confessed Jesus as their Lord before that day. But the moment he saw that Jesus’ dead body had indeed risen from the grave, he saw that this same body contained the fullness of the Godhead. Jesus did not deny this but instead complemented Thomas for seeing and believing this who He truly was.

John 20:29  Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, BECAUSE THOU HAST SEEN ME, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.

A human’s flesh and bone body can increase “in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man.” It was such a body that the omnipresent, omnipotent, and omniscient God prepared to finish the death, burial, and resurrection of the Messiah (see Hebrews 10:5). Thus, “God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself” (see 2 Corinthians 5:19). This completed work became the New Covenant gospel of Jesus Christ. Thus, the perfect God robed Himself in imperfect human flesh to become the perfect plan to reconcile man’s spiritual separation from God and become members of God’s perfect body of Christ. (see Matthew 5:17; 1 Corinthians 12:12-27; Ephesians 5:24-32; Hebrews 10:14). Thank God for His perfect plan!

Note: Any UPPERCASE, bold, or [bracket] areas in Scripture is added for emphasis.

Copyright © 2019 TK Burk. All Rights Reserved.
www.tkburk.com

The next part of this study will explore question #7: Born in sin or sin and become a sinner?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *